Aboriginal Art in Canada: First Nations Artists, Inuit Art, Northwest Coast Art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem Pole, Buffy Sainte-Marie Books LLC

ISBN: 9781158209491

Published: August 30th 2011

Paperback

268 pages


Description

Aboriginal Art in Canada: First Nations Artists, Inuit Art, Northwest Coast Art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem Pole, Buffy Sainte-Marie  by  Books LLC

Aboriginal Art in Canada: First Nations Artists, Inuit Art, Northwest Coast Art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem Pole, Buffy Sainte-Marie by Books LLC
August 30th 2011 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 268 pages | ISBN: 9781158209491 | 8.70 Mb

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 43. Chapters: Inuit art, Northwest Coast art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem pole, Haida argillite carvings,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 43. Chapters: Inuit art, Northwest Coast art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem pole, Haida argillite carvings, Kwakwakawakw art, Salish weaving, Coast Salish art, James Schoppert, Jennie Thlunaut, Tupilaq, Mungo Martin, Masks among Eskimo peoples, Ellen Neel, Museum of Inuit Art, Dentalium shell, Bill Holm, Duane Pasco, Dorothy Grant, Joe David, Charles Edenshaw, Chilkat weaving, Roy Henry Vickers, Willie Seaweed, Robert Davidson, Richard Hunt, Thunderbird Park, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Henry Hunt, Louis Riel: A Comic-Strip Biography, Tony Hunt, Aboriginal Curatorial Collective, Reg Davidson, Eskimo Artist: Kenojuak, The Living Stone, Kwanusila, Tlugwe, Alcheringa Gallery, Dennos Museum Center.

Excerpt: Totem poles are monumental sculptures carved from large trees, mostly Western Red Cedar, by cultures of the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. The word totem is derived from the Ojibwe word odoodem, his kinship group. Being made of cedar, which decays eventually in the rainforest environment of the Northwest Coast, few examples of poles carved before 1900 exist. Noteworthy examples include those at the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, BC and the Museum of Anthropology at UBC in Vancouver, BC, dating as far back as 1880.

And, while 18th century accounts of European explorers along the coast indicate that poles certainly existed prior to 1800, they were smaller and few in number. In all likelihood, the freestanding poles seen by the first European explorers were preceded by a long history of monumental carving, particularly interior house posts.

Eddie Malin has proposed that totem poles progressed from house posts, funerary containers, and memorial markers into symbols of clan and family wealth and prestige. He argues that pole construction centered around the Haida people of the Queen Charlot...



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Aboriginal Art in Canada: First Nations Artists, Inuit Art, Northwest Coast Art, Thunderbird, Bill Reid, Totem Pole, Buffy Sainte-Marie":


gajowka-vita.pl

©2009-2015 | DMCA | Contact us